FAQs

How long do the lashes last?

They are semi-permanent and last anywhere from 3-6 weeks in total. The total length of lash life expectancy will be based solely on your own bodies lash cycle, home maintenance, wear habits and a variety of other factors including your astrological sign and core body temperature. The truth is doing crazy reckless things will effect how well your lashes stay on and how great they stay looking. We do our best to find the best performing adhesive for your lash and lifestyle and we do our best to educate you on the recommended care.

 

Do they ruin your lashes?

Heck no, not if we do them. Now with that being said we try to educate anyone and everyone we cross paths with about lash health and sustainability. Not all lash artists have the same training, like any other professional. Everyone does things differently, the way we do things, is in our professional opinion the most optimum approach to lash health and sustainability. The natural lash tells us it’s tolerance for length and weight, we cannot go against what we know is healthy for your lash. If lash health isn’t really a concern for you or your lashes, then we are just not the place for you.

 

Why are lashes so expensive?

The way we look at lashes is simple. We use only the best products, we are educated in what we do, and we strive for perfection. We are incapable of churning out poor quality lashes and we don’t believe in rushing a service that is meant to be as detailed and tedious as brain surgery. We charge on average the nationwide industry standard for lash extensions performed by fully trained, licensed, and industry experienced artists.

 

Do you do “mink” lashes?

At The Lash Exchange we do not use any “genuine, mink fur lashes”. Now before you scoff, it is mainly because of the durability of the lashes, they just don’t hold up as well as synthetic, in our opinion. Secondly, no we don’t support the use of animals for lashes, the “faux” is the way to go! Over 80% of “mink” lash sets advertised are “faux mink”. Mink is an industry term that is tossed around to describe a finish, taper, or texture of the extensions, not necessarily the material.